22-deepwater.jpg
 
 
conduit-books_logo.jpg

Conduit Books & Ephemera

Surprise! It’s our birthday. After twenty-five years of defying commonsense by publishing a poetry magazine without any visible means of support, we’re celebrating by launching an equally outlandish project: Conduit Books & Ephemera. A practical soul might wonder if the world needs more poetry books. To which we say, Does the world need more bottle-nosed dolphins and octopi? More stars and moons? More saxophones or mountain trails? Of course not, but life is so much better with them! In the process of publishing 28 issues of this mad concoction we call Conduit, we’ve published hundreds of writers and read tens of thousands of poems. We know there are amazing manuscripts out there and we intend to publish the best of them.

We‘ve considered publishing books for eons, but it wasn’t until the one and only Bob Hicok suggested a collaboration that we decided to take the big plunge. We’re thrilled. The result of our collaboration is the Marystina Santiestevan First Book Prize. For more on Marystina, please checkout Bob’s note posted below.

Bob has been an inspiration, an ally, a friend, and a frequent contributor to Conduit for years…and now he’s officially a co-conspirator! We’re so grateful for his support—artistic, emotional, and financial.

And, yes, we’re doubling down on our lunacy by launching a second prize that is open to all, even poets over 30. The Minds on Fire Open Book Prize recognizes that the best books aren’t always first books.

Of course, we’ll keep our eyes peeled for other manuscripts that both stand out and capture the Conduit spirit. Happy Birthday to us! Hell, Happy Birthday to everyone!

 

Marystina Santiestevan First Book Prize

Awarded annually to a poet writing in English who has not yet published a full-length poetry book, the prize is named in honor of a great supporter of young poets, and the grandmother-in-law of the contest’s final judge, Bob Hicok. Prospective entrants are encouraged to familiarize themselves with Conduit, which champions originality, intelligence, irreverence, and humanity.

Previously unpublished manuscripts of 48-90 pages should be submitted through our Submittable page.

Because the prize is judged anonymously, the author’s name should not appear anywhere in the collection, i.e., neither on the title page nor in the body of the manuscript. If applicable, please include an acknowledgments page, listing any previous publication for the individual poems in the collection.

The winning poet will receive $1,000 and 25 author copies. Current and former students of Mr. Hicok are not eligible to apply, however they are eligible for the Open Prize.

Submission period: August 1-October 15, 2018.

submit

Minds on Fire
Open Book Prize

Awarded annually and open to any poet writing in English, regardless of previous publication record, the prize seeks to represent the best contemporary writing in high quality editions of enduring value. Prospective entrants are encouraged to familiarize themselves with Conduit, which champions originality, intelligence, irreverence, and humanity. All manuscripts welcome, be they first books or last books.

Previously unpublished manuscripts of 48-90 pages should be submitted through our Submittable page.

Because the prize is judged anonymously, the author’s name should not appear anywhere in the collection, i.e., neither on the title page nor in the body of the manuscript. If applicable, please include an acknowledgments page, listing any previous publication for the individual poems in the collection.

The winning poet will receive $1,000 and 25 author copies. The Conduit editorial board will select the winning manuscript. Current and former employees and interns of Conduit are not eligible.

Submission period: August 1-October 15, 2018.

submit

Prefer the USPS?

Submit your manuscript through the USPS to: Conduit Books & Ephemera , 788 Osceola Avenue , Saint Paul, Minnesota, 55105

A Few Words about Marystina Santiestevan

Marystina Santiestevan loved poetry, labor unions, animals, plants, and poets. When I met her and Henry, her husband, I enjoyed a most un-American experience: I was immediately treated as an honored guest in their house, even made to sit in Henry’s chair, just because I was a poet. Marystina wouldn’t trim trees, kill bugs, shoo deer, or say no to a martini with dinner. I’ve known many people who try to accept the world as it comes to them and one who was able to do so. I want to honor her gentleness by sponsoring a poetry prize in her name, and to thank her for passing her spirit on to Eve Trager, her granddaughter, who I’ve lived with for thirty years. I don’t know how people like them come to exist, but we are all lucky they do.

—Bob Hicok